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Archive for the ‘The Bug Blog’ Category

Top 10 Tips To Prevent and Eradicate Bed Bugs

Wednesday, October 21st, 2015

Until 2010, bed bugs were fairly rare in the United States. Increased global travel and other factors, however, have made them surprisingly common today. A small infestation can rapidly spiral out of control, but taking specific measures can help you prevent or eradicate a bed bug problem.
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5 Reasons Hiring An Exterminator Can Save You Money

Tuesday, October 13th, 2015

Many people believe that hiring a Tucson exterminator is prohibitively expensive. They try to save money by performing DIY pest control instead. While this can sometimes head off the immediate problem, it rarely solves the underlying issue, forcing homeowners to try again and again. Hiring an exterminator can actually save you money in the long run. Here are 5 reasons why.

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Mosquitoes in Arizona

Thursday, August 27th, 2015

 

Mosquitoes and their Nasty Hitchhikers

Nothing can ruin a sunny day outdoors faster than any kind of pest. Intoxicated relatives or obnoxious neighbors aside, the mosquito often ranks as the most unwelcome visitor to just about every type of gathering. Not only are they equal opportunity hunters, their venom leaves an itchy and lasting impression. People, pets, even wild animals are vulnerable to the bite of this pesky predator. For years, mosquitoes have been treated more as an annoyance than a pest to be truly concerned about. With the introduction of new and a resurgence of older, familiar diseases, some of them deadly, being directly attributed to mosquitoes as their sole source of distribution and carriers, there is a new cause for concern circulating through our state. Despite the scientific and technological advances in the eradication processes of this pest, mosquitoes somehow seem to maintain an advantage. Not only are these pests becoming more dangerous to leave untreated and untouched, but it appears they are increasing in numbers. From a human population standpoint, this seems to be true.  As our communities expand, the increased water usage creates new breeding grounds for this pest, allowing their populations to keep pace right alongside our housing developments.  (more…)

3 Reasons Why Doing Your Own Pest Control Can Be Dangerous

Saturday, August 8th, 2015

Discovering unwanted pests in your home can be upsetting and frustrating. Besides being unpleasant, they can cause serious damage as well as create an unhealthy environment for you and your family. While it may be tempting to take the do-it-yourself route when it comes to eliminating these pests, the truth is that this method can end up doing more harm than good. When it comes to pest control, it’s best to leave it to the professionals. To prove it, here are 3 reasons why doing your own pest control can be dangerous. (more…)

Do You Hear What I Hear?

Wednesday, June 3rd, 2015

Throughout history, and as far back as 500 B.C., the cricket has been synonymous with good luck and prosperity, particularly within Chinese culture. Their song, however, valued for its rhythmic and musical quality, is only produced by males of the species. Many people believe crickets make their sound when they rub their legs together. This is not true. Crickets make their sound by rubbing their wings together. Male crickets have ridges on their front wings that look a little like teeth and a hardened edge on each front wing. When a male cricket is trying to attract a mate or warn away a rival, he rubs the ridges on one wing against the hardened area of his other wing. This creates the chirping sound. The tone of the chirping will depend on how close together re ridges are on his wings. Both male and female crickets have a special auditory organ on their forelegs that lets them hear the chirps.

A cricket will continue his “song” until he attracts a mate or he senses something is wrong and danger is approaching. Crickets have been functioning as Mother Nature’s miniature early alarm systems for decades, long before mankind even dreamed up or invented warning systems and sirens. From thunderstorms to earthquakes and erupting volcanoes, if the joyful little crickets around spontaneously and without cause suddenly stop singing, it may be time to head for shelter or higher ground. (more…)

The Great Awakening

Thursday, April 23rd, 2015

Winter is the season when inspects go deep into the ground, often burrowing down to the root masses of plants to begin a period of a hibernation-like state. This, in conjunction with a reduced watering schedule, provides these pests with a nicely insulated relatively dry and comfortable place to spend their slumber.

Spring is the time of rebirth, renewal, and regeneration. When the weather loses its frosty bite, it is time to begin that wonderful annual tradition of spring cleaning. We through open doors and windows, letting that fresh air in. We clean out closets, garages, and reset or watering systems in anticipation of the warmer months to come. At the same time, we unwittingly set in motion an upcoming onslaught of potentially epidemic proportions. As the outside temperature rises, so do the metabolisms of the pests resting underground. Just as we shed our heavy outer layers, the insect world begins their preparations for the upcoming season. As their metabolisms rise, their need to feed resumes. And who, in any kingdom, can forget that all-consuming ritual of seeking a mate?

As our activities shift from indoors to out, we spend more time tending to gardens and lawns, flowers and trees, bushes and hedges. We can spend hours fertilizing, trimming and watering our way back to their peak condition and natural beauty. Alongside all of this activity comes with the cruelest trick of all for burrowed insects. What seems like just enough water to satisfy those thirsty plant roots is actually a catastrophic, tsunami-like event from with there is no escape for the dwellers underground.

Earwigs are unique in that they tend to care for their young–a very unusual characteristic for any type of insect. As increased watering occurs, the disruption of their habitat exposes both adult and immature insects all in one location, often giving the appearance that earwigs have the ability to spontaneously multiply.

So how does the affect you as both a landscaper and homeowner? (more…)

5 Unbelievable Facts About Bed Bug Infestations

Thursday, April 9th, 2015

Bed bugs are a major problem in today’s society. Until around 2010, they were relatively rare in the United States, but their prevalence has grown astronomically since then. Tiny and hard to see, bed bugs can cause itching and misery. They spread rapidly, and infestations usually require professional treatment. Yet many people are misinformed about these pesky invaders. (more…)

5 Tips To Keep Spiders Out Of Your Home

Thursday, April 9th, 2015

Although spiders can be quite beneficial by trapping other pests in their webs, the fear of spiders is one of the most common phobias of all. In addition, both active and inactive spider webs can make your home look dirty and unkempt. Of course, some spiders, such as the black widow and Arizona brown recluse, are dangerous and should never be allowed inside the home. Although professional pest control is the only way to banish these invaders for good, following 5 simple tips can greatly reduce the chances of spiders making a new home with you.

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Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner?

Thursday, March 19th, 2015

Formosan TermiteIntroduce a foreign dish or person into your home and watch your family react.  Drop them or it right in the middle of the living room or the dinner table and watch the fireworks fly. This is a theme that has been tackled in movies, plays and television for years.  Sidney Portier depicts this guest of honor in a 1967 classic, and (no pun intended) ‘brought the issue home’ for many Americans. Coincidentally, it was also during the 1960’s that the Formosan Termite was first discovered within the Continental United States.  Texas, Louisiana and South Carolina were the first unfortunate recipients, and later this same species was discovered thriving in Florida.  Formosan termites were then, and continue to be, the most aggressive and destructive timber pests in the United States. Unlike the gracious Mr. Portier, these guests are never welcome at anybody’s table or in any home.

The Formosan Termite cultivates a massive nest containing millions of insects.  They relentlessly and aggressively seek out and consume anything with cellulose, or fiber, almost seeming to target the crucial supports in most structures.  Any type of wood, including utility poles, docks and other vital wooden structures are at risk.  Very few things are impervious to infestation from this pest, including living trees. Formosan termites have been found in everything from Oak and Cypress to Pine and Maple trees, even while the trees were still alive.  More troubling still is the electrical cabling and lead shielded wiring that does not remain untouched during their foraging activities.  From power cables to wires in cable boxes, all have come under attack and suffered failure with this insect around. This termite is indeed a force to be reckoned with! (more…)

Wood You Like To Be My Neighbor?

Tuesday, March 17th, 2015

Next time, instead of checking your phone while stopped at a stoplight, take a look around. The desert Southwest is full of wonder and mystery. Notice anything unusual at the bottom of the buildings around you? Look closer at the tiny dirt trails snaking up the sides of their concrete bases.  Have you ever wondered what those are or how they got there?  These are the tell tale signs of subterranean termites.  Living underground, these busy termites travel back and forth within these dirt highways from their homes to the wood source they are currently using as food, doing incredible amounts of unseen damage. (more…)

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