(520) 886-4146 or (800) 887-4146
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(520) 886-4146 or (800) 887-4146
(520) 886-4146
(800) 887-4146
Menu

Spiders

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Need help controlling your spider problem?

The Pest Management Professionals at University Termite & Pest Control are highly trained in today’s most up-to-date treatment methods. We pride ourselves on our family-friendly spider control. We attack pests, not pets or children. If you have any concerns about allergies or chemical sensitivities, please speak with our representative when you make your appointment. He or she will answer all your questions about our insect exterminating process.

We invite you to call us today for more information or to make an appointment. If you are ready to banish your spiders for good, call University Termite & Pest Control:

Tucson: 520-886-4146

Toll-Free: 800-887-4146

SPIDERS

Though there are many kinds of spiders in Arizona, relatively few are a real concern to people, and even fewer are really dangerous. It is true that all spiders can bite and that all have venom. Most do not have a large or strong enough dose of venom to do any significant harm. In fact, some of the most common spiders aren’t even seen or recognized by the average homeowner! Spiders can be identified by the type of web they create. However, not all webs are used to capture prey. Some are used in courtship rituals while others are used as nests.

Arizona Brown Spider

Arizona Brown Spider

Arizona Brown Spider

The Arizona brown spider, or desert recluse spider, is a potentially harmful pest found in the Desert Southwest. It is uniformly brown in coloring, making the tell-tale recluse violin marking on the cephalothorax fairly difficult to detect.  Like other recluse spiders, the Arizona brown spider is unique in the fact that it has only six eyes–not eight as found on most spiders. They prefer dry, dark places, and will often be found in bedding or under clothing left on the floor. The bite of this spider can be necrotic, meaning it can cause damage to skin and tissue. The bite itself is usually not felt and reactions vary depending on factors such as the amount of venom injected and the sex of the spider. Some people will  have no reaction to the bite at all, while others will feel an immediate sting, followed by severe pain. Blisters may form leading to a wound that can take weeks to heal. If you suspect an Arizona brown spider bite, seek medical attention.

Black Widow Spider

Black Widow Spider

Black Widow Spider

The black widow spider gets its name from the popular myth that females eat males shortly after mating. Truth be told, this rarely occurs-the male will only be eaten if the female mistakes him for a meal! It can be found throughout the world, and is considered to be the most venomous spider in the U.S. This spider prefers protected shelter such as under rocks and wood or in quite parts of basements and garages. Females have a shiny black body and a red hourglass shape on the bottom of the abdomen. Males are about half the size of the female, with smaller bodies and longer legs. The venom sac of the male never fully develops, and they are less likely to bite with less venom to inject. The female, however, is extremely venomous with venom fifteen times more potent than that of a rattlesnake! The black widow tends to bite defensively (for example, when their web is provoked), and is not always felt. An indicator of a black widow bite is a red, raised bump with two visible fang marks. The venom contains toxins that are toxic to the nervous system and severity of reaction depends on several factors, including individual sensitivity and and amount of venom injected. Anyone suspecting a possible black widow bite should seek immediate medical attention.

Brown Recluse Spider

The brown recluse spider gets its name from its secretive habits, and prefers to hide in the quietest spot it can find. It’s found primarily in the southern, western, and midwestern U.S., particularly in Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Missouri.  It is typically brown in coloring, with a dark violin marking on the cephalothorax . The brown recluse spider, like other recluse spiders, is unique in the fact that it has only six eyes–not eight as found on most spiders. They prefer dry, dark places, and will often be found in bedding or under clothing left on the floor. The bite of this spider can be necrotic, meaning it can cause damage to skin and tissue. The bite itself is usually not felt and reactions vary depending on factors such as the amount of venom injected and the sex of the spider. Some people will  have no reaction to the bite at all, while others will feel an immediate sting, followed by severe pain. Blisters may form leading to a wound that can take weeks to heal. If you suspect a brown recluse spider bite, seek medical attention.

Daddylongleg Spider

Daddylongleg Spider

Daddylongleg Spider

Daddylongleg spiders, also known as cellar spiders, get their name from their long, thin legs and their preference for living in dark, damp areas (such as cellars). They are not considered an important pest from a health perspective. Rather, they are a considered a nuisance pest because of their webs. Instead of consuming old webs (as many spider species do), cellar spiders will keep adding to their webbing, creating a mess to clean. Sweeping up and vacuuming webs, egg sacs, and spiders, along with sealing entry points, is a great place to start when seeking control methods

House Spider

House spider is the generic name for the spiders you will most commonly find indoors. They construct webs in upper corners, window frames, basements, and cellars to capture their food. They are not considered an important pest from a health perspective. Rather, they are a considered a nuisance pest because of their webs. These webs are random and can be numerous. If a web is not successful in catching food, the spider will then abandon the spot, selecting another spot so it can try again! Sweeping up and vacuuming webs, egg sacs, and spiders, along with sealing entry points, is a great place to start when seeking control methods.

Tarantulas

Tarantula

Tarantula

Tarantulas are the world’s largest spiders (ranging from 4.5 to 11 inches in length) and may look terrifying , but they are actually quite docile. These spiders rarely bite humans, and when they do, it is usually in response to being provoked. Tarantula bites for most people are about as painful as a bee sting and cause even less harm. From a health perspective, they are not important! There are over 800 species found throughout the world, and 30 known species in the U.S., found primarily in the southwestern states. Appearance varies from species to species, where you will find coloring anywhere from black/brown to vividly colored and striped. They are nocturnal hunters. Some smaller species feed on smaller insects such as grasshoppers or beetles, while some larger species feed on frogs and lizards. Although tarantulas produce silk, they do not create webs to catch their food. Instead, they ambush prey and conquer it using its legs, then injecting venom. They are solitary in nature, and if you find one burrowing in your home, chances are it will be alone. Pesticides are rarely necessary. Simply capture the creature and release outdoors. But be careful how you toss! Tarantulas have a thin skin, and a fall from even a short distance can cause a fatal fracture to its exoskeleton.

Wolf Spiders

Wolf Spider

Wolf Spider

The wolf spider is a robust, hairy hunting spider known for its speed and and excellent eye sight, and is found throughout the world. There are around 200 species in the U.S. alone, most commonly found in prairie areas. These spiders can deliver a poisonous, painful bite, but their venom is not lethal to humans. They are one of the few spiders that do not make webs to catch prey. Instead, they will wander on foot until they encounter a suitable insect to feast on. Once this spider has found a target, it will ambush it and quickly dig in! One distinguishing physical characteristic of the wolf spider is eye placement. Eight eyes are are arranged in three rows: the first row has four small eyes; the second row has two larger eyes and the third row has two medium-sized eyes. The two eyes in the second row are noticeably the biggest of all the eyes. Wolf spiders might wander into your home looking for a tasty snack, and once inside, could find it cozy enough to stay. You can help minimize the potential encounters by clearing out clutter and debris from around the exterior of your home. Sealing cracks and other points, along with using strategically placed glueboards are also effective ways to control these unwanted visitors.

ARE YOU PROTECTED?

Do you need help controlling a spider problem? Don’t settle for an exterminator! Call the Pest Management Professionals at University Termite & Pest Control. They have the skill and knowledge to identify pests and make a correct diagnosis the first time, every time.

University Termite & Pest Control, The Ones Who Know…